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Federal - HR 2083

Endangered Salmon and Fisheries Predation Prevention Act

Introduced

April 8, 2017

Description

A bill to amend the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 to reduce predation on endangered Columbia River salmon and other nonlisted species, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Oppose

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 4

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • June 27, 2018T. Graves, R-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E398

  • June 27, 2018T. Graves, R-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E398

  • June 27, 2018Gutierrez, D-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.294, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E933

  • June 27, 2018Gutierrez, D-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E933

  • June 27, 2018Gutierrez, D-Ill., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E933

  • June 27, 2018Taylor, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E930

  • June 27, 2018Taylor, R-Va., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E930

  • June 27, 2018Yoder, R-Kan., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E929

  • June 27, 2018Yoder, R-Kan., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E929

  • June 27, 2018 — Received in the Senate and referred to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. Congressional Record p. S4505, S4506

  • June 26, 2018Sewell, D-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.294, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E924

  • June 26, 2018Sewell, D-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E924

  • June 26, 2018Sewell, D-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. E924

  • June 26, 2018E.L. Carter, R-Ga., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.294, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5706

  • June 26, 2018Y. Clarke, D-N.Y., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.294, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5706

  • June 26, 2018Y. Clarke, D-N.Y., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5706

  • June 26, 2018Y. Clarke, D-N.Y., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5706

  • June 26, 2018Delaney, D-Md., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5674

  • June 26, 2018Delaney, D-Md., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted nay if present. Congressional Record p. H5674

  • June 26, 2018Roby, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5674

  • June 26, 2018Roby, R-Ala., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5674

  • June 26, 2018Cole, R-Okla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.292, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5674

  • June 26, 2018Cole, R-Okla., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5674

  • June 26, 2018Holding, R-N.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.291, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H5672

  • June 26, 2018House Vote 294 Predatory Sea Lions and Salmon Fish Stock — Passage
    Passage of the bill that would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to issue permits for certain state governments to hunt for sea lions. The states that would be eligible for the permits would be Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and American Indian Tribes with lands surrounding the Columbia River and its tributaries, and each permit would authorize the taking of up to 100 sea lions. Passed 288-116. Congressional Record p. H5705

  • June 26, 2018 — Substitute amendment, as amended, adopted by voice vote. Congressional Record p. H5703-H5705

  • June 26, 2018 — Vargas, D-Calif., amendment no. 3, that would require the Interior Department to report to Congress on the effects of the lethal taking of pinnipeds on the recovery of salmonid stocks in the waters of the Columbia River or its tributaries, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H5704

  • June 26, 2018 — Kilmer, D-Wash., amendment no. 1, that would only allow hunting permits to be issued for sea lions, rather than all pinnipeds, adopted by voice vote. Amendment text. Congressional Record p. H5704

  • June 26, 2018 — Considered by the House. Congressional Record p. H5696-H5705

  • June 26, 2018House Vote 292 Fiscal 2019 Defense Appropriations and Predatory Marine Mammals Hunting Permits — Rule
    Adopted of the rule (H Res 961) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2019 defense appropriations (HR 6157) and would provide for consideration of the bill (HR 2083) that would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to issue permits for certain state governments to hunt certain predatory marine mammals. Adopted 222-172. Congressional Record p. H5672-H5673

  • June 26, 2018House Vote 291 Fiscal 2019 Defense Appropriations and Predatory Marine Mammals Hunting Permits — Previous Question
    Cheney, R-Wyo., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 961) that would provide for House floor consideration of the fiscal 2019 defense appropriations (HR 6157) and would provide for consideration of the bill (HR 2083) that would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to issue permits for certain state governments to hunt certain predatory marine mammals. Motion agreed to 219-172. Congressional Record p. H5672

  • June 25, 2018 — Rules Committee resolution, H Res 961, reported to the House as a rule for HR 2083.

  • June 25, 2018 — House Rules Committee granted a structured rule providing for consideration of the bill. Congressional Record p. H5622

  • June 25, 2018 — Full committee proceeding held by the House Rules Committee.

  • Sept. 5, 2017 — Reported to the House by the House Natural Resources Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 115-289Congressional Record p. H6653

  • July 26, 2017 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Natural Resources Committee.

    July 26, 2017 — Committee Vote: Columbia River Sea Lion Predation — Environmental Review
      Huffman, D-Calif. —

    Amendment that would require the Interior secretary to determine whether non-lethal alternative measures to reduce sea lion predation of salmon in the Columbia River or its tributaries listed as threatened or endangered species adequately protect the salmon from California sea lion predation. It would give the secretary up to 90 days, from the bill's enactment date, to make the determination. It would require the secretary to publish the determination in the Federal Register and allow for a 30-day public comment period on the determination.

    It would allow the secretary to issue a permit to an eligible entity to authorize the intentional killing of California sea lions on the Columbia River and its tributaries if the secretary determines that non-lethal alternative measures to reduce the sea lion predation on salmon in the river listed as threatened or endangered species do not adequately protect the salmon from the seal lions.

    When issuing a permit, it would require the secretary to consult with other eligible entities and consider the number of other permits issued to other eligible entities authorizing sea lion takings in the same time period which takings would be authorized by the permit.

    It would delineate that each permit would allow for the killing of up to 10 sea lions during the permit duration, but the bill would specify that the total number of sea lions to be taken per year for all permits could not exceed 1 percent of the annual level of sea lions necessary to reach or maintain its optimum sustainable population.

    The bill would bar the intentional killing of a California sea lion under a permit unless the permit holder has determined that the sea lion has preyed on salmon in the Columbia River and nonlethal alternative measures to prevent preying on the salmon by the sea lion have not been effective.

    It also would strike a section in the bill that would specify that the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 would not apply to the permit process and the issuance of any permit during the five-year period starting on the bill's enactment date.

    Amendment that would require the Interior secretary to determine whether non-lethal alternative measures to reduce sea lion predation of salmon in the Columbia River or its tributaries listed as threatened or endangered species adequately protect the salmon from California sea lion predation. It would give the secretary up to 90 days, from the bill's enactment date, to make the determination. It would require the secretary to publish the determination in the Federal Register and allow for a 30-day public comment period on the determination.

    It would allow the secretary to issue a permit to an eligible entity to authorize the intentional killing of California sea lions on the Columbia River and its tributaries if the secretary determines that non-lethal alternative measures to reduce the sea lion predation on salmon in the river listed as threatened or endangered species do not adequately protect the salmon from the seal lions.

    When issuing a permit, it would require the secretary to consult with other eligible entities and consider the number of other permits issued to other eligible entities authorizing sea lion takings in the same time period which takings would be authorized by the permit.

    It would delineate that each permit would allow for the killing of up to 10 sea lions during the permit duration, but the bill would specify that the total number of sea lions to be taken per year for all permits could not exceed 1 percent of the annual level of sea lions necessary to reach or maintain its optimum sustainable population.

    The bill would bar the intentional killing of a California sea lion under a permit unless the permit holder has determined that the sea lion has preyed on salmon in the Columbia River and nonlethal alternative measures to prevent preying on the salmon by the sea lion have not been effective.

    It also would strike a section in the bill that would specify that the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 would not apply to the permit process and the issuance of any permit during the five-year period starting on the bill's enactment date.

    Rejected 14-20.

    July 26, 2017 — Committee Vote: Columbia River Sea Lion Predation — Vote to Report

    Allow the Interior secretary to issue a permit to the states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho as well as several Native American tribes to authorize the intentional lethal taking of California sea lions and non-Endangered Species Act Steller sea lions on the Columbia River and its tributaries to protect endangered or threatened salmon and other nonlisted species.

    It would require the secretary to approve or deny any permit application within 30 days of receiving the application.

    Under the bill, a permit would be effective for up to one year and may be renewed. A permit would allow for the taking of up to 100 sea lions during the permit duration with the total number of sea lions to be taken per year for all permit cumulatively could not exceed 10 percent of the annual potential biological removal level.

    It would require permit holders to be trained in natural resource management.

    It would allow the secretary to suspend the issuance of permits if, after five years from the bill's enactment date, the secretary determines that lethal removal authority is no longer necessary to protect salmon and other fish species from sea lion predation. It would require the secretary to consult with state and tribal fishery managers before making the determination.

    Allow the Interior secretary to issue a permit to the states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho as well as several Native American tribes to authorize the intentional lethal taking of California sea lions and non-Endangered Species Act Steller sea lions on the Columbia River and its tributaries to protect endangered or threatened salmon and other nonlisted species.

    It would require the secretary to approve or deny any permit application within 30 days of receiving the application.

    Under the bill, a permit would be effective for up to one year and may be renewed. A permit would allow for the taking of up to 100 sea lions during the permit duration with the total number of sea lions to be taken per year for all permit cumulatively could not exceed 10 percent of the annual potential biological removal level.

    It would require permit holders to be trained in natural resource management.

    It would allow the secretary to suspend the issuance of permits if, after five years from the bill's enactment date, the secretary determines that lethal removal authority is no longer necessary to protect salmon and other fish species from sea lion predation. It would require the secretary to consult with state and tribal fishery managers before making the determination.

    Ordered reported favorably to the full House 21-14.
  • July 25, 2017 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Natural Resources Committee.

  • July 20, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    McMorris Rodgers, (R-Wash.)
  • June 8, 2017 — Subcommittee hearing held by the House Natural Resources Committee, Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans.

  • May 23, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Young, Don (R-Alaska)
  • May 16, 2017 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Newhouse, (R-Wash.)
  • April 8, 2017 — Original cosponsor(s): 1

    Schrader, (D-Ore.)
  • April 8, 2017 — Read twice and referred to: House Natural Resources.Congressional Record p. H2796