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Federal - HR 737

Shark Fin Sales Elimination Act, H.R. 737

Introduced

January 23, 2019

Description

A bill to prohibit the sale of shark fins, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Support

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 264

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Oct. 17, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Kildee, (D-Mich.)
  • Oct. 16, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Blunt Rochester, (D-Del.)Cardenas, (D-Calif.)Thompson, G. (R-Pa.)
  • Oct. 15, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Courtney, (D-Conn.)Garcia, (D-Ill.)
    Davis, D. (D-Ill.)Grijalva, (D-Ariz.)
  • Oct. 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Carson, (D-Ind.)Garcia, (D-Texas)Pascrell (D-N.J.)
  • Oct. 8, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Lee, (D-Nev.)McBath, (D-Ga.)Thompson, B. (D-Miss.)
    Maloney, C. (D-N.Y.)Stevens, (D-Mich.)
  • Oct. 4, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 8

    Cleaver (D-Mo.)Jeffries, (D-N.Y.)Serrano, (D-N.Y.)
    Cooper, (D-Tenn.)Moore, (D-Wis.)Wild, (D-Pa.)
    Fletcher, (D-Texas)Scott, R. (D-Va.)
  • Sept. 27, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Clay, (D-Mo.)
  • Sept. 26, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Horn, (D-Okla.)Morelle, (D-N.Y.)Pressley, (D-Mass.)
  • Sept. 19, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Gonzalez, (D-Texas)Peters, S. (D-Calif.)Spanberger, (D-Va.)
    Luria, (D-Va.)Pingree, (D-Maine)Timmons (R-S.C.)
  • Sept. 18, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Natural Resources Committee.

    Sept. 18, 2019 — Committee Vote: Shark Fins Sale Prohibition — Substitute Amendment
      Webster, R-Fla. —

    Substitute amendment that would amend a law related to illegal and unregulated fishing activities (PL 114-81) to require the Commerce secretary to report to the president any nation that has imported shark products into the United States and any nation that has not sought and obtained a certification from the secretary verifying a regulatory shark conservation program is in effect.

    It also would prohibit the import of shark products into the U.S. unless the shark products are of a species of shark that were landed in a nation to which the secretary has granted a certification for, excluding shark products that are:

    • Traded, owned, held or otherwise possessed by an employee or agent of a governmental agency for law enforcement purposes.
    • Used for noncommercial subsistence purposes in accordance with federal, state, tribal or territorial law.
    • Used solely for display, education, conservation or research purposes by an accredited zoo, aquarium, museum, college or university.
    • Used by any other person under a state or federal permit to conduct non-commercial scientific research.

    It also would allow the secretary to:

    • Grant a certification to any nation that has adopted and effectively enforces regulatory programs to provide for the conservation and management of sharks, and measures to prohibit shark finning, that are comparable to those of the United States.
    • Grant a partial certification for one or more specific species of shark to a nation if the secretary determines that such nation has adopted and effectively enforces regulatory programs that are comparable to the regulatory programs of the U.S. and has an effective ban on shark finning in place that is comparable to the United States.

    It also would state that a certification would expire within three years of date of issuance and may be renewed based on the regulations set forth by the secretary within two years of the bill's enactment, regarding the submission, evaluation, revocation and renewal of certification applications.

    It also would direct the secretary to set criteria for determining whether a nation effectively enforces regulatory programs for the conservation and management of sharks, including measurements to prohibit shark finning that are comparable to the U.S., including the requirement that those programs:

    • Provide for regularly updated management plans, scientifically established catch limits, and bycatch assessments and minimization.
    • Include program to prevent overfishing and to rebuild overfished stocks.
    • Require reporting and data collection.
    • Include a mechanism to ensure that, if the nation allows landings of sharks by foreign vessels that are not subject to such programs of such nation, only shark products that comply with such programs are exported to the United States.

    It also would expand the actions taken by international fishery management organizations in conserving and managing fish stocks under their jurisdiction to ensure actions are consistent with the International Plan of Action for Conservation and Management of Sharks of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

    It also would include rays and skates in the seafood traceability program, which reports on fish and fish products imported to the United States.

    Substitute amendment that would amend a law related to illegal and unregulated fishing activities (PL 114-81) to require the Commerce secretary to report to the president any nation that has imported shark products into the United States and any nation that has not sought and obtained a certification from the secretary verifying a regulatory shark conservation program is in effect.

    It also would prohibit the import of shark products into the U.S. unless the shark products are of a species of shark that were landed in a nation to which the secretary has granted a certification for, excluding shark products that are:

    • Traded, owned, held or otherwise possessed by an employee or agent of a governmental agency for law enforcement purposes.
    • Used for noncommercial subsistence purposes in accordance with federal, state, tribal or territorial law.
    • Used solely for display, education, conservation or research purposes by an accredited zoo, aquarium, museum, college or university.
    • Used by any other person under a state or federal permit to conduct non-commercial scientific research.
    • It also would allow the secretary to:

    • Grant a certification to any nation that has adopted and effectively enforces regulatory programs to provide for the conservation and management of sharks, and measures to prohibit shark finning, that are comparable to those of the United States.
    • Grant a partial certification for one or more specific species of shark to a nation if the secretary determines that such nation has adopted and effectively enforces regulatory programs that are comparable to the regulatory programs of the U.S. and has an effective ban on shark finning in place that is comparable to the United States.
    • It also would state that a certification would expire within three years of date of issuance and may be renewed based on the regulations set forth by the secretary within two years of the bill's enactment, regarding the submission, evaluation, revocation and renewal of certification applications.

      It also would direct the secretary to set criteria for determining whether a nation effectively enforces regulatory programs for the conservation and management of sharks, including measurements to prohibit shark finning that are comparable to the U.S., including the requirement that those programs:

    • Provide for regularly updated management plans, scientifically established catch limits, and bycatch assessments and minimization.
    • Include program to prevent overfishing and to rebuild overfished stocks.
    • Require reporting and data collection.
    • Include a mechanism to ensure that, if the nation allows landings of sharks by foreign vessels that are not subject to such programs of such nation, only shark products that comply with such programs are exported to the United States.
    • It also would expand the actions taken by international fishery management organizations in conserving and managing fish stocks under their jurisdiction to ensure actions are consistent with the International Plan of Action for Conservation and Management of Sharks of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

      It also would include rays and skates in the seafood traceability program, which reports on fish and fish products imported to the United States.

      Withdrawn.

      Sept. 18, 2019 — Committee Vote: Shark Fins Sale Prohibition — Vote to Report

      Prohibit the possession, sale or purchase of any shark fin or product containing shark fin.

      The bill also would punish violators of the bill based on provisions in a law that regulates exploitation of U.S. coastal fisheries (PL 94-265), which holds violators liable for a civil penalty.

      The bill also would direct the Commerce secretary to assess fines of up to $100,000 per violation.

      The bill also would allow for exemptions for those who possess a shark fin that was lawfully taken, in which the shark fin is separated from the shark in a manner consistent with a license or permit and is:

      • Destroyed or discarded upon separation.
      • Used solely for display or research purposes by a museum, college or university.
      • Retained for a non commercial purpose.

      The bill also would allow for exemptions for those who possess, sell or purchase any fresh or frozen raw fin or tail from any stock of Mustelus canis (smooth dogfish) or Spualus acanthias (spiny dogfish).

      It also would require the secretary, no later than Jan. 1, 2027, to review exemptions and submit a report to Congress that includes a recommendation on the continuation of the exemption or the termination of the exemption. It also would require that such recommendation be based on:

      • The economic viability of dogfish fisheries with and without the continuation of the exemption.
      • The impact to ocean ecosystems of continuing or terminating the exemption.
      • The impact on enforcement of the ban caused by the exemption.
      • The impact of the exemption on shark conservation.

      Prohibit the possession, sale or purchase of any shark fin or product containing shark fin.

      The bill also would punish violators of the bill based on provisions in a law that regulates exploitation of U.S. coastal fisheries (PL 94-265), which holds violators liable for a civil penalty.

      The bill also would direct the Commerce secretary to assess fines of up to $100,000 per violation.

      The bill also would allow for exemptions for those who possess a shark fin that was lawfully taken, in which the shark fin is separated from the shark in a manner consistent with a license or permit and is:

    • Destroyed or discarded upon separation.
    • Used solely for display or research purposes by a museum, college or university.
    • Retained for a non commercial purpose.
    • The bill also would allow for exemptions for those who possess, sell or purchase any fresh or frozen raw fin or tail from any stock of Mustelus canis (smooth dogfish) or Spualus acanthias (spiny dogfish).

      It also would require the secretary, no later than Jan. 1, 2027, to review exemptions and submit a report to Congress that includes a recommendation on the continuation of the exemption or the termination of the exemption. It also would require that such recommendation be based on:

    • The economic viability of dogfish fisheries with and without the continuation of the exemption.
    • The impact to ocean ecosystems of continuing or terminating the exemption.
    • The impact on enforcement of the ban caused by the exemption.
    • The impact of the exemption on shark conservation.
    • Ordered reported favorably to the full House 16-13.

  • Sept. 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Griffith, (R-Va.)
  • Sept. 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Swalwell, (D-Calif.)
  • Aug. 30, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Nadler, (D-N.Y.)
  • Aug. 27, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Green, A. (D-Texas)Veasey, (D-Texas)
  • Aug. 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Adams, (D-N.C.)
  • Aug. 20, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Butterfield, (D-N.C.)
  • Aug. 16, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Rice, K. (D-N.Y.)
  • Aug. 6, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Carter, E.L. (R-Ga.)
  • July 24, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Allred, (D-Texas)
  • July 17, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Demings, (D-Fla.)
  • July 15, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Burchett, (R-Tenn.)Scanlon, (D-Pa.)
  • July 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Kirkpatrick, (D-Ariz.)Porter, (D-Calif.)
  • July 2, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Emmer, (R-Minn.)
  • June 26, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Bergman, (R-Mich.)
  • June 25, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Budd, (R-N.C.)
  • June 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Levin, (D-Mich.)Simpson, (R-Idaho)Underwood, (D-Ill.)
  • June 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Escobar, (D-Texas)Kilmer, (D-Wash.)
  • June 10, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Clark, K. (D-Mass.)Sarbanes, (D-Md.)Trone, (D-Md.)
    Frankel, (D-Fla.)Schrier, (D-Wash.)
  • May 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Hayes, (D-Conn.)Murphy, S. (D-Fla.)
    McEachin, (D-Va.)Price, (D-N.C.)
  • May 7, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    DelBene, (D-Wash.)Hastings, (D-Fla.)Schiff, (D-Calif.)
    Finkenauer, (D-Iowa)Horsford, (D-Nev.)Sherman, (D-Calif.)
  • April 15, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 7

    Axne, (D-Iowa)Kelly, T. (R-Miss.)Sherrill, (D-N.J.)
    Crow, (D-Colo.)Meeks, (D-N.Y.)
    Grothman, (R-Wis.)Palazzo, (R-Miss.)
  • April 4, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 9

    Brown, A. (D-Md.)Marchant, (R-Texas)Steube, (R-Fla.)
    Collins, C. (R-N.Y.)Payne (D-N.J.)Turner, (R-Ohio)
    Jackson Lee, (D-Texas)Pence, (R-Ind.)Upton, (R-Mich.)
  • March 26, 2019 — Subcommittee hearing held by the House Natural Resources Committee, Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife.

  • March 25, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Barragan, (D-Calif.)Fleischmann, (R-Tenn.)Hagedorn, (R-Minn.)
    Craig, (D-Minn.)Granger, (R-Texas)Hunter, (R-Calif.)
  • March 21, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Babin, (R-Texas)Stauber, (R-Minn.)Yoho, (R-Fla.)
    Crenshaw, (R-Texas)Wilson, J. (R-S.C.)
  • March 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Levin, (D-Calif.)Walorski, (R-Ind.)
  • March 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Cunningham, (D-S.C.)Slotkin, (D-Mich.)
  • March 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 11

    Beatty, (D-Ohio)Cox, (D-Calif.)Schneider, (D-Ill.)
    Carbajal, (D-Calif.)Lofgren, (D-Calif.)Tonko, (D-N.Y.)
    Case, (D-Hawaii)Mucarsel-Powell, (D-Fla.)Wright, (R-Texas)
    Correa, (D-Calif.)Olson, (R-Texas)
  • Feb. 27, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 22

    Brownley, (D-Calif.)Larsen, R. (D-Wash.)Rouda, (D-Calif.)
    Cicilline, (D-R.I.)Lujan, B.R. (D-N.M.)Rush, (D-Ill.)
    Engel, (D-N.Y.)Marshall, (R-Kan.)Stefanik, (R-N.Y.)
    Eshoo, (D-Calif.)Neguse, (D-Colo.)Vargas, (D-Calif.)
    Higgins, B. (D-N.Y.)O'Halleran, (D-Ariz.)Wexton, (D-Va.)
    Himes, (D-Conn.)Pocan, (D-Wis.)Zeldin, (R-N.Y.)
    Kim, (D-N.J.)Richmond, (D-La.)
    Lamb, (D-Pa.)Rooney, F. (R-Fla.)
  • Feb. 14, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 9

    Brindisi, (D-N.Y.)LaHood, (R-Ill.)Pappas, (D-N.H.)
    Cummings, (D-Md.)Larson, J. (D-Conn.)Sires, (D-N.J.)
    Fortenberry, (R-Neb.)Napolitano, (D-Calif.)Smucker, (R-Pa.)
  • Feb. 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 12

    Bacon, (R-Neb.)DeSaulnier, (D-Calif.)Norcross, (D-N.J.)
    Casten, (D-Ill.)Jayapal, (D-Wash.)Stivers, (R-Ohio)
    Connolly, (D-Va.)Malinowski, (D-N.J.)Welch, (D-Vt.)
    DeLauro, (D-Conn.)McGovern, (D-Mass.)Woodall, (R-Ga.)
  • Feb. 4, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 17

    Cisneros, (D-Calif.)Haaland, (D-N.M.)Roe, (R-Tenn.)
    Costa, (D-Calif.)Harder, (D-Calif.)Rose, (D-N.Y.)
    Dean, (D-Pa.)Heck, (D-Wash.)Takano, (D-Calif.)
    Delgado, (D-N.Y.)Joyce, (R-Ohio)Walden, (R-Ore.)
    Gabbard, (D-Hawaii)Lawrence, (D-Mich.)Watkins, (R-Kan.)
    Guthrie, (R-Ky.)Lawson, (D-Fla.)
  • Jan. 29, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 22

    Beyer (D-Va.)Krishnamoorthi, (D-Ill.)Pallone (D-N.J.)
    Bustos, (D-Ill.)Langevin, (D-R.I.)San Nicolas, (D-Guam)
    Castor, (D-Fla.)Lowey, (D-N.Y.)Schrader, (D-Ore.)
    Davis, S. (D-Calif.)Lynch, (D-Mass.)Shalala, (D-Fla.)
    DeFazio, (D-Ore.)Matsui, (D-Calif.)Speier, (D-Calif.)
    Espaillat, (D-N.Y.)McCollum, (D-Minn.)Wasserman Schultz, (D-Fla.)
    Estes, (R-Kan.)Meuser, (R-Pa.)
    Kind, (D-Wis.)Neal, (D-Mass.)
  • Jan. 24, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 18

    Bass, (D-Calif.)Doyle, (D-Pa.)Maloney, S.P. (D-N.Y.)
    Bera, (D-Calif.)Foster, (D-Ill.)Moulton, (D-Mass.)
    Clarke, Y. (D-N.Y.)Gottheimer, (D-N.J.)Ruppersberger, (D-Md.)
    Cohen, (D-Tenn.)King, P. (R-N.Y.)Schakowsky, (D-Ill.)
    Deutch, (D-Fla.)Lee, B. (D-Calif.)Scott, D. (D-Ga.)
    Dingell, (D-Mich.)Loebsack, (D-Iowa)Yarmuth, (D-Ky.)
  • Jan. 23, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 50

    Aguilar, (D-Calif.)Huffman, (D-Calif.)Radewagen, (R-A.S.)
    Bishop, S. (D-Ga.)Johnson, H. (D-Ga.)Raskin, (D-Md.)
    Blumenauer, (D-Ore.)Kaptur, (D-Ohio)Reschenthaler, (R-Pa.)
    Bonamici, (D-Ore.)Katko, (R-N.Y.)Roybal-Allard, (D-Calif.)
    Boyle, (D-Pa.)Keating, (D-Mass.)Ryan, T. (D-Ohio)
    Buchanan, (R-Fla.)Kennedy, Joseph P. (D-Mass.)Schweikert, (R-Ariz.)
    Calvert, (R-Calif.)Kinzinger, (R-Ill.)Smith, Adam (D-Wash.)
    Cartwright, (D-Pa.)Kuster, (D-N.H.)Soto, (D-Fla.)
    Chabot, (R-Ohio)Lipinski, (D-Ill.)Suozzi, (D-N.Y.)
    Crist, (D-Fla.)Lowenthal, (D-Calif.)Thompson, M. (D-Calif.)
    Davis, R. (R-Ill.)McCaul, (R-Texas)Titus, (D-Nev.)
    DeGette, (D-Colo.)McNerney, (D-Calif.)Torres, (D-Calif.)
    Fitzpatrick, (R-Pa.)Mitchell, (R-Mich.)Vela, (D-Texas)
    Gallego, (D-Ariz.)Norton, (D-D.C.)Watson Coleman, (D-N.J.)
    Garamendi, (D-Calif.)Panetta, (D-Calif.)Weber, (R-Texas)
    Gomez, (D-Calif.)Perlmutter, (D-Colo.)Wilson, F. (D-Fla.)
    Hill, (D-Calif.)Quigley, (D-Ill.)
  • Jan. 23, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: House Natural Resources.Congressional Record p. H1171